Scripture

The First Social Distancers

"Just as the ten lepers daringly approached Jesus, we are all vulnerable and in need of mercy and kindness." In this week's post, Jim Vigil, Director of the Doctor of Ministry Program at Southeastern University, relates biblical instances of social distancing to our present times. ... Read More...

The Significance of the Holy Spirit at Christmas

The biblical stories of Jesus’ birth aren’t there just to tell us about how Jesus happened to come into the world. They are there to remind us of Jesus identity. As the angels told the shepherds, Jesus was not just any baby; he is “the Savior—yes, the Messiah, the Lord” (Luke 2:11). In this week’s post, Andrew Gabriel, author and theologian, discusses the significance of the Holy Spirit during a time when its relevance is often forgotten amidst the busyness from the holiday season. ... Read More...

The Church and the Other

The language we as the church often embody conveys that we have blocked those outside the faith versus inside the church by constructing unseen walls. How can this be so, if we claim to welcome all? In this week’s post, Jenna MacFarlane, senior at Southeastern University, addresses this imbalance within communities and how we as the church can develop healthier language in helping the Other feel authentic belonging. ... Read More...

Why Pray?

The New Testament priority for prayer was adopted by the early church. Mark 1:35 records the pattern of Jesus’ ministry mentioned several other times in the Gospels: “The New Testament priority for prayer was adopted by the early church. Mark 1:35 records the pattern of Jesus’ ministry mentioned several other times in the Gospels: “And rising very early in the morning, while it was still dark, he departed and went out to a desolate place, and there he prayed.” The Incarnate Son of God made prayer a regular part of his life. In this week’s post, Dr. Ehler, Dean of Southeastern University’s college of theology and religion, discusses the posture of prayer and the significance it has in cultivating our relationship with God. ... Read More...

Materialism in the Christian Context

Materialism, and all its associated encumbrances, have been the subject of Christian discourse since the beginning of the Christian era. It is none other than a hermit, John the Baptist, whose blistering imperative to, “Repent! For the kingdom of heaven is at hand!” opens the New Testament. In this week’s post, Dr. Britt, director of Global Education at Southeastern University, discusses Christian perspectives of a world living under a materialistic umbrella. ... Read More...

Muted Skeptics Spawning Cynics

We may find that if we listen, dialogue with, and engage authentically with those who have questions or false premises about the church, not only may we hear something we have missed, but we might even grow our understanding from it. This week Aaron Ross, theology professor at Southeastern University, continues from his recent post in the discussion of skeptics within the church and addresses how we as a community might gather our response. ... Read More...

ReReading Romans 13

Many Christians in our society are drawn to “law and order,” thinking that such a decisive and forceful approach will address problems of social and political corruption and confusion. Romans 13 is often misused as justification for this perception. In this week’s article, Dr. Chris Green, theology professor at Southeastern University, discusses several findings from Romans 13 commonly misunderstood and advocates that Christians believe not in law and order, but in the Spirit.... Read More...

The Groaning of a Prisoner

Grace can cost everything you have to offer and more, but in the end you will declare with Paul, “For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us,” (Rom. 8:18, NASB). In this week's discussion Dr. Margaret de Alminana, associate professor of theology at Southeastern University, shares her rationale of spiritually rescuing prisoners based on her many years serving as Senior Chaplain of Women at the Orange County Jail. ... Read More...

Making Peace with the Warrior God

How are we to deal with certain brutalities found in the Old Testament? How do we know what is and isn’t worthy of God? The good news is that God means to put us in that difficult place. He means to save us not from interpretation but through it. Dr. Chris Green, professor at Southeastern University, provides four approaches on how Christians today should perceive and interpret God's seemingly violent Old Testament acts in a rather confounding context. ... Read More...

An Exploration of Biblical Commentary

For some, biblical commentaries might seem intimidating; however, they are just as essential spiritually for the individual as they are communally for the church. In this week’s feature, we explore achievable methods that will enable you to deepen your exegetical study by using commentaries. Through sharing these four simplified steps, we encourage you to stand upon your own researched findings instead of solely upon others’ thoughts.... Read More...

Rest Assured

Rest. As a practice this word remains irrelevant to some people, and it occupies a marginal amount of space in the lives of others. We barely need to look around us to recognize how busyness is ingrained into not only what we do, but also virtually into who we are. How can we take time to step back from working, and reflect on the "daily grind"?... Read More...

The Madness of Learning

There has been somewhat of a stigma that too much theological learning, too much questioning, or too much interaction with those who might question some orthodox beliefs will lead one to lose his/her faith. Sometimes Acts 26:24 is even cited poorly as an attempt to credit those claims. We recently asked Dr. Craig Keener, F. M. and Ada Thompson Professor of Biblical Studies at Asbury Theological Seminary and author of over 20 books ranging from works for the church to dense theological tomes, how he understands the intersection of faith and learning.... Read More...

Jesus and a Theology of Shame

There is an important discussion to be had when shame and openness meet. Brene’ Brown –someone who has popularized the shame discussion from a clinical study POV – has said in her viral TED videos, “If you are breathing you have felt shame.” This is good in at least one respect: no one is alone in the experience of shame. How we handle shame in todays culture is one of the most pressing discussions for this time. ... Read More...

The Old Testament and Life Formation

There appears to be an increasing tendency for believers to overlook the importance of reading and studying the Old Testament. However, without the Old Testament, how can we fully grasp the New? Reading the Old Testament is vital for the life of a believer. Here are some thoughts on how and why followers of Christ should deeply read these life giving texts. ... Read More...